17 Apr, 2024

Green Day, Notorious B.I.G., and Blondie added to National Recording Registry

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Green Day, Notorious B.I.G., and Blondie added to National Recording Registry

Green Day, the Notorious B.I.G and The Chicks are among the latest artists whose work will be preserved forever in Washington, D.C.

On April 16, the U.S. Library of Congress announced the 2024 class of titles selected for induction into the National Recording Registry, with the organization explaining the 25 chosen songs and albums are "worthy of preservation for all time based on their cultural, historical or aesthetic importance in the nation’s recorded sound heritage."

Out of 2,899 nominations, albums that made the cut include Green Day's 1994 major label debut "Dookie", The Chicks' 1998 major label debut "Wide Open Spaces" and the Notorious B.I.G.'s 1994 debut "Ready to Die" — his sole full-length release before his tragic 1997 death.

Billie Joe Armstrong of Green Day spoke to the Library of Congress about Dookie getting chosen for the class of 2024, explaining that the album's lasting impact is because "the lyrics are just so honest and from where my life was at that time."

"We always wanted to be in this band forever," reflected Armstrong, 52. "I think in the back of our minds was to be able to play music together for the rest of our lives. So that's, that's quite a goal when you're 20 or 21 years old. But, you know, we've managed to do it, and it's just been an amazing journey so far."

Blondie's Parallel Lines is another title joining the Library of Congress, and Debbie Harry told the Library of Congress she recalls Chrysalis Records "didn't like" or "hear any hits" on the 1978 album — which spawned classics including "One Day or Another" and "Heart of Glass."

"The old problems of art and commerce are sometimes very restrictive," said Harry, 78, "and I think that we, somehow being a bit of a fringe element, got to do some things that were, you know, groundbreaking."

Additional albums inducted into the Library of Congress this year include ABBA's 1976 Arrival, Lee Morgan's 1964 The Sidewinder, Jefferson Airplane's 1967 Surrealistic Pillow, Lily Tomlin's 1971 This Is a Recording, J.D. Crowe & the New South's 1975 self-titled album, The Cars' 1978 self-titled debut album and Kronos Quartet's 1982 Pieces of Africa.

Songs in the 2024 class include Gene Autry's 1949 "Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer," Bill Withers' "Ain't No Sunshine," Doug E. Fresh and Slick Rick's "La-Di-Da-Di," Bobby McFerrin's "Don't Worry, Be Happy," Juan Gabriel's "Amor Eterno," Benny Goodman Sextet with Charlie Christian's 1939 "Rose Room," Viola Turpeinen and John Rosendahl's 1928 "Kauhavan Polkka," Lt. James Reese Europe’s 369th U.S. Infantry (Hell Fighters) Band's 1919 "Clarinet Marmalade," Patti Page's 1950 "Tennessee Waltz," Jackie Brenston and His Delta Cats' "Rocket '88'," Perry Como's 1957 "Catch a Falling Star" and "Magic Moments," Johnny Mathis' "Chances Are" and Héctor Lavoe's "El Cantante."

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden spoke about the newly inducted recordings — which bring the total number of titles to 650 — in a statement.

"We have selected audio treasures worthy of preservation with our partners this year, including a wide range of music from the past 100 years, as well as comedy," she said. "We were thrilled to receive a record number of public nominations, and we welcome the public’s input on what we should preserve next."

Source: People

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