18 May, 2024

Slash teams Up With Demi Lovato for cover of "Papa Was A Rollin' Stone"

Views News
1 380
Likes News
0
Dislikes News
0
Comments News
0
Slash teams Up With Demi Lovato for cover of "Papa Was A Rollin' Stone"

Slash, the iconic, Grammy-winning guitarist and songwriter, has just released his blues solo album "Orgy Of The Damned", via Gibson Records. The 12-track project features guest appearances by AC/DC's Brian Johnson, Aerosmith's Steven Tyler, Iggy Pop, Chris Stapleton, THE Black Crowes' Chris Robinson, ZZ Top's Billy F. Gibbons, Bad Company's Paul Rodgers, Demi Lovato and Gary Clark Jr. Slash is backed on the album by prior collaborators Johnny Griparic (bass) and Teddy Andreadis (keyboards),as well as drummer Michael Jerome and singer/guitarist Tash Neal.

Lovato lends her powerhouse voice to "Papa Was A Rollin' Stone", a fervent, soulful version of the 1972 single by THE TEMPTATIONS that Slash admired as a kid. Although the song veers more towards R&B, the guitarist wanted to give it his own impassioned spin.

Regarding how Lovato ended up singing "Papa Was A Rollin' Stone", Slash told Rolling Stone: "That was so left-field for everybody involved, because she's from the pop world. But I had this very distinct idea in my mind of her voice delivering that lyric and the emotional content of that story. I know her background. She's had her share of missteps in life, and we've known each other for a little while, so I called her up and I asked her about it. It turns out that that song really meant a lot to her. So she came in and delivered a powerhouse fucking vocal that I think will be a huge surprise to people that are familiar with her other stuff."

Lovato said in a statement: "Slash is a legendary talent and friend I've known for years, so I was thrilled to collaborate with him again for his project. He brought such an amazing energy when we were in the studio and reimagining this iconic song together was effortless and fun. He had such a clear vision for the song and I'm grateful that he wanted to honor my story. I'm so proud of what we created!"

"Orgy Of The Damned" encompasses a broad range of styles within the blues genre, veering from an upbeat, rowdy take on Robert Johnson's "Crossroads" to a plaintive, twanging rendition of T. Bone Walker's "Stormy Monday". Some of the songs, like Steppenwolf's "The Pusher", Charlie Segar's "Key To The Highway" and Albert King's "Born Under A Bad Sign", had been performed by Slash's Blues Ball while others, like Stevie Wonder's "Living For The City", were longtime favorites for Slash. "Hoochie Coochie Man", written by Willie Dixon and made famous by Muddy Waters in 1954, showcases the in-the-moment nature and unrestrained energy of "Orgy Of The Damned", with ZZ TOP's Billy F. Gibbons stepping in on guitar and vocals. The group went into a rehearsal room in North Hollywood and began hashing out soulful, rollicking takes on the classic songs. Everything was played live in the room, with an emphasis on improvisation which resulted in a collection of dynamic, energized songs that are immediate, raw, and distinctly familiar.

As Slash was considering vocalists, he approached his old friend and collaborator Iggy Pop, who had long wanted to record a blues song. Pop suggested Lightnin' Hopkins's 1962 track "Awful Dream", a sparse, drawling number originally laid down on acoustic guitar. The duo decided to recreate that stripped back vibe and recorded their own languid, emotionally-resonate version sitting on two stools in Slash's studio.

The album concludes with a soaring original instrumental number, "Metal Chestnut", penned specifically for "Orgy Of The Damned" by Slash.

The first single, "Killing Floor", features Johnson on vocals and Tyler on harmonica.

On the topic of the inspiration for the "Orgy Of The Damned" album title, Slash told Germany's Rock Antenne: "It's the only title I came up with. It was just because blues and rock and roll have always been considered taboo and devil's music and all that kind of stuff. And it's 'hide your kids from that.' And I wasn't raised to think that, but I know society at large has always had that kind of attitude towards it, but of blues especially. And so when I thought about having a collaborative thing with all these different artists doing a blues record — 'Orgy Of The Damned', right? It seems so obvious to me, and I actually Googled it to see if somebody else had already used it, but they hadn't."

When the interviewer suggested that it must have been a "logistical nightmare" getting all those guest musicians to appear on the LP, Slash said: "It's difficult. I mean, you basically just have to get on the phone, and if they say 'yes', then okay. So that's really the hardest part, is calling people up and asking the question and seeing if they'll do it. And I was fortunate doing this, because I picked songs that… What I would do is I'd have the song and then go, 'Okay, who should sing this?' And whoever came to mind as being the appropriate singer, I would call them up. But, fortunately, I picked the right song for them to sing and so they would identify with it automatically. And so then that would make them feel more obligated to get involved and sing it properly or whatever goes through one's mind. But it was great because all the different artists were so open to the material and it really meant something to them. So, what happened was the vocal delivery really came from the heart; they were really singing from a place of connecting with the material."

Asked if there was anybody he wanted to get to appear on the album but couldn't, Slash said: "Well, the biggest one, really, the one that bums me out was [late MOTÖRHEAD leader] Lemmy. That was because there was a moment there where [I thought], 'F**k, man, Lemmy would be great.' And I still haven't gotten used to the fact that he's not here, 'cause I'm so used to him being there. So that was the big one. I try not to make a big deal out of it. There's some people that I couldn't contact until after the record was done. And then they showed up, and [I would tell them] the record's done already. But other than that, everybody that I thought of were there."

Although he grew up in England, Slash's American grandmother turned him on to the blues early on and he was immediately taken with B.B. King. At the same time, his parents raised him on a healthy diet of '60s British rock 'n' roll, from The Who to The Kinks. Once he moved to Laurel Canyon, Slash found himself surrounded by rock and folk singers like Joni Mitchell, Crosby, Stills & Nash and Neil Young — all of whom eventually inspired his playing and songwriting. It wasn't until he began playing guitar himself that Slash realized all of his favorite musicians had been influenced by the same B.B. King blues records he'd listened to as a young kid.

Although Slash's new LP is his second under the "Slash" banner, he has released a handful of albums with his long-running band Slash featuring Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators, in which he is joined by Alter Bridge frontman Myles Kennedy.

Source: Blabbermouth

Show Business

13 Jun, 2024
Views News
76
Likes News
0
Dislikes News
0
Comments News
0
12 Jun, 2024
Views News
204
Likes News
0
Dislikes News
0
Comments News
0
11 Jun, 2024
Views News
297
Likes News
0
Dislikes News
0
Comments News
0
10 Jun, 2024
Views News
387
Likes News
0
Dislikes News
0
Comments News
0
9 Jun, 2024
Views News
486
Likes News
0
Dislikes News
0
Comments News
0
7 Jun, 2024
Views News
709
Likes News
0
Dislikes News
0
Comments News
0
5 Jun, 2024
Views News
890
Likes News
0
Dislikes News
0
Comments News
0
4 Jun, 2024
Views News
967
Likes News
0
Dislikes News
0
Comments News
0
3 Jun, 2024
Views News
1 092
Likes News
0
Dislikes News
0
Comments News
0
2 Jun, 2024
Views News
1 168
Likes News
0
Dislikes News
0
Comments News
0
1 Jun, 2024
Views News
1 127
Likes News
0
Dislikes News
0
Comments News
0